Coconut …


Known as the tree of life … Davao corners the biggest area planted to coconut. Coconut is a tree where all it parts can be of use … from the trunk, the leaves and more especially the fruit.  And lately, foreign personalities go crazy about “buko” juice and based on personal experience taking this juice makes me more active.  In an article published by Digital Running Club on coco water it said it could replenish electrolyte in the body after a though workout as it contains all five essential electrolytes, namely, potassium, magnesium, phosphorous, sodium, and calcium.  A lot can be done about coconut and this Davao businessman explored into producing coco syrup which became popular in other foreign markets … here’s my story …

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Davao businessman finds new foreign markets for coco syrup

DAVAO CITY, Aug. 17 (PNA) — A Davao businessman has found new foreign markets for coco syrup in Germany and Australia.

Benjamin Lao, president of Lao Integrated Farms Inc. (LIFI), said their company as one of the major players in the coconut industry in the Davao Region, had initially exported some 1,200 liters of coco syrup to Germany and another 900 liters to Australia in July this year.

“That volume is just our initial export since we just began last month. There’s a growing demand for coco syrup in the global market,” Lao said.

He also said local coconut producers in the region will find another boost in terms of income since negotiation is ongoing between them and the new global markets to allow the entry of coconut products, including coco sugar, syrup and seasoning in Japan and Canada.

Lao said 80 percent of the total production of their coco syrup is exported to global markets while only 20 percent distributed locally.

He said the United States and European countries remain as LIFI’s top international markets.

Lao said they have been exporting to these international markets since 2009 of about 8,000 liters of coco syrup and about a ton of coco sugar a month.

Lao said his firm produces 350 kilograms of coco sugar and 600 liters of coco syrup a day. These products, derived from the coco sap.

He also assured local coconut producers that exporting coco syrup will not wipe out the copra business in the country.

“The production of these products will not affect the copra, since the coconut sap comprises only 2 to 10 percent of the coconut tree,” Lao said.

In order to increase production of coco sap, he recommended planting two dwarf varieties of coconut — the Mawa and Aromatic — that can produce an average of four litres day. (PNA) Prix Digna D. Banzon/ldp/utb

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